1. todaysdocument:

    usnatarchivesexhibits:

    MEMBERS OF THE GOLDEN CIRCLE SENIOR CITIZENS CLUB OF FAIRMONT HOLDING QUILT THEY MADE. THE QUILT WAS RAFFLED OFF DURING THE FAIRMONT CENTENNIAL IN MAY, 1973, 05/1973” 

    Comes from Environmental Protection Agency

    Happy Senior Citizens Day!

    President Ronald Regan proclaimed the day and said, “For all they have achieved throughout life and for all they continue to accomplish, we owe older citizens our thanks and a heartfelt salute. We can best demonstrate our gratitude and esteem by making sure that our communities are good places in which to mature and grow older — places in which older people can participate to the fullest and can find the encouragement, acceptance, assistance, and services they need to continue to lead lives of independence and dignity.”

    Source: http://go.usa.gov/jz8C

     

    #DOCUMERICA Fan?  The exhibit  "Searching for the Seventies: The DOCUMERICA Photography Project" closes September 8.  Catch it now at the National Archives!

     

  2. livelymorgue:

    A photo spread from 1924 showed the adventures of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Morden of Chicago hunting tigers in India and Nepal. Perhaps not as sensitively as it could have, a caption described “a free ride for a big cat: helpers of the Morden party bringing in one of the victims aboard an elephant.” Photo: The New York Times

    (via asiasociety)

     

  3. This mid-century map of American folklore is fascinating. There’s so many fascinating stories we’ve never heard of! (Zoomable version on the site: http://slate.me/16cyfDA )

     

  4. When the Marquis de Lafayette toured the States in 1824-1825, people were so excited to see him that they wore souvenir gloves like this one: http://slate.me/13A0fGV 

     

  5. Travel within the US can feel like a slog today. But, as these maps show, it was once far sloggier. http://slate.me/1bEbUo9

     

  6. A stunning, saddening two-page summary of violent incidents reported by civil rights workers and citizen activists in McComb, Miss., during the summer of ‘64: http://slate.me/16eAaey

     

  7. American women stayed out of national politics until the debate over Andrew Jackson’s Indian removal plan in 1830. Here’s one of the very first, very humble petitions that a group of women signed and sent to Congress: http://slate.me/16bFAH6

     

  8. ourpresidents:

    The Truman Library recently accepted some new objects into their museum collection. The family of Luther Bass, a prisoner of war in the Philippines during World War II, donated this diary and roster kept by Bass while in captivity, first in the Philippines, and then in Japan. In 1973, the Library received a United States flag that the prisoners at that camp made from parachutes that dropped supplies into the camp after its liberation in August 1945.

    The flag is currently on exhibit in the Presidential Years gallery of the Truman Library.

     

  9. How the first African-American female cartoonist spoke through a smart, politically aware girl character named Patty-Jo. Read more (and learn more) here: http://slate.me/13WbVC3

     

  10. This very, very tall chart from 1931 promises to tell the whole story of human history. This giant, ambitious chart fit neatly with a trend in nonfiction book publishing of the 1920s and 1930s: the “outline,” in which large subjects (the history of the world! every school of philosophy! all of modern physics!) were distilled into a form comprehensible to the most uneducated layman. See more here: http://slate.me/144ciXL